waldemirom2091

Walz Mateus Mateus itibaren 38911 El Sabino, Gto., Meksika itibaren 38911 El Sabino, Gto., Meksika

Okuyucu Walz Mateus Mateus itibaren 38911 El Sabino, Gto., Meksika

Walz Mateus Mateus itibaren 38911 El Sabino, Gto., Meksika

waldemirom2091

Şimdiye kadar okuduğum en etkileyici ve büyüleyici kitaplardan biri. Briggs, Azizlik'e yol açan süreç gibi karmaşık bir konuyu ele geçirebilir ve neredeyse dram gibi yeni bir roman haline getirebilir. Tüm ana oyunculardaki kapsamlı arka plan bilgisi, sonunda eski arkadaşlar gibi hissettiğiniz kadar becerikli bir şekilde sunulur. Pek çok kurgusal olmayan kitap okudum ve en çok keyif aldığım sırada, Üçüncü Mucize en sevdiğim kitapların üst kademesine yükseldi. Başkalarının da keşfetmek umuyoruz toplam bir mücevher.

waldemirom2091

http://www.twolipsreviews.com/content...

waldemirom2091

I've long had a soft spot for Pooh Bear, Tigger, Eeyore, and Kanga in particular. In many ways, this was as charming as the bits of stories I remember from childhood. The illustrations are simple and sweet. I enjoyed the dry British humour. I'm still a bit amazed at the seeming sophistication of including poor, passive-aggressive (or depressed? or both?) Eeyore, but maybe he was simply based on someone Milne knew. At times, though, I have to admit that a certain pattern of unfinished conversations got a bit tedious.(Is this a typically British thing or a childlike thing? It can be funny in small amounts, like Ricky Gervais' character in Night at the Museum.) While the stories may very well be little amusements created by a father for his son that are intended to be taken at face value, I did find myself wondering what lesson or lessons might have been intended. In general, there is a theme of not being unkind to those who mean well. The schemes to teach Kanga and Roo and Tigger lessons backfire. (Is Rabbit jealous of any animal bouncier than himself?) Someone always remembers to be kind to Eeyore, and Eeyore is reminded that he could go visit someone instead moping that no one comes to see him. Milne also seems to poke a bit of fun at those who consider themselves smarter than others or "above" others. While Owl and Rabbit are respected for their supposed "Brain", both do silly things and end up being helped by the other, often kinder, animals. Eeyore thinks he's smarter than the others, but he makes a mistake while trying to help Owl find a new house. Overall, this book is a light, sweet treat and a reminder of childhood forever preserved onto pages.